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In the Long Run: Investing in Your Long Term Success as a Solopreneur

Posted by on Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

What invisible force pushes a marathon runner to reach the finish line? Sometimes it seems like people who attain great things in life are being guided by something mysterious and magical; an inner strength that almost seems non-human. What makes us human in the first place, though, is that we doubt, and make mistakes. Being humans, we are also meant to survive and push through, because we have survived on this earth for a very long time. We know how to stand upright, on our own two feet. But no one said it was easy.

The race can feel long but the payoff in the end will always feel worth it.

At times it can feel almost grueling to persevere when there are days when making a morning pot of coffee feels overwhelming. It would be so easy to go back to bed, lie down and decide to quit. This is especially true if you work in a career that requires your own motivation and persistence to pay off. The race can feel long, but the payoff in the end will always feel worth it.

Karen Fitzgerald, an independent Consultant for Rodan + Fields, offers a more specific example, advising, “Don’t use phrases like ‘I’m going to try to increase my income in the next year,’ or ‘I would like to replace my income.’ Say, ‘I’m going to earn six figures within the next year.’ Pronouncing what you will do, and telling yourself that’s what is definitely ahead makes the goal concrete. It’s not an abstract wish, or a fanciful daydream. Now you can see the finish line, however many miles away it may be. The hard part is in the middle – in the effort it takes to get there.

Anything we do that is worth our time, perseverance, and commitment, will be difficult at times. And we won’t always have coaches cheering us on

An athlete hears no one but his or her self while running. The shouts from spectators, birds chirping in the trees, the sound of other runners all fade into the distance. Only the rhythm of their own breathing, the steady pulse of their heart beating. At any moment, they could tell themselves that their body is giving out, that they need to stop. Nearing that final stretch seems close, but still very far away.

Anything we do that is worth our time, perseverance, and commitment, will be difficult at times. And we won’t always have coaches cheering us on. Sometimes we have to tell ourselves, to remind us why we want to win a race, or write a book, or own a business.

In the long run, it doesn’t matter how fast you go, or even how far. What matters is that you go the distance you told yourself you could reach

Rodan + Fields Consultant Maura Nelson says that when she started her business, she told herself from the beginning that she was going to make it work. She had setbacks along the way, of course, and disappointments when she didn’t make a sale or a connection she had hoped for. In those moments, she has to listen to her own persistent heart, and retell herself the story of why it’s worth it to persevere. She relates, “When I have a disappointment I have to remind myself of why I’m doing this in the first place. I think of my child, and remember what this has already done for us in one short year. Then I visualize the possibility of how much more I can achieve in the long run.”

In the long run, it doesn’t matter how fast you go, or even how far. What matters is that you go the distance you told yourself you could reach. When you tell yourself about the day you crossed the finish line, victorious, the sound of fanfare quieting the sound of your own heavy breathing – that becomes your story.

The information, materials and views provided by a Rodan + Fields Independent Consultant during this presentation are her or his own and do not necessarily represent the views of Rodan + Fields. Rodan + Fields makes no representations about the accuracy of the information. The stories shared may be atypical experiences among Consultants who join the business. Actual earnings vary significantly, and no income is promised or guaranteed. Potential Consultants are urged to perform their own due diligence prior to making any decision to participate.

For information regarding earnings under the U.S. R+F Compensation Plan, see the Income Disclosure Statement.

For information regarding earnings under the Canada R+F Compensation Plan, see the Income Disclosure Statement. We estimate that in Canada the typical plan participant will earn between $1,700 and $2,000 CAD per year.

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6 Responses to “In the Long Run: Investing in Your Long Term Success as a Solopreneur”

  1. Iris Rodgers says:

    I agree with your statements and thoughts about persevering even when I’m feeling that I’m never going to succeed in this business. I pick myself up, raise my head and think of all the difficulties I have faced where I did succeed before; raising my daughter by myself;learning to swim even though I was terrified of the water & becoming a certified SCUBA diver! Learning to drive in NYC! Facing my fears head on with the knowledge that I will only get stronger and achieve my goals is what keeps me going every day!

  2. I love the comparison to running. A year and a half ago I ran a half marathon. My intention was to run half and run/walk the rest as my longest run had been 6 miles. When I got to the halfway mark I decided to go for a personal distance of 7 miles. After each mile I told myself to see if I could make it one more. This was probably one of the hilliest courses I could have run. When I got to 11 miles I knew I had to finish or I would regret it. I finished. This business is the same way. I refuse to quit and regret it. Each hill can represent a setback or a challenge. If you keep plugging along you will make it to the top.

  3. Gail Correa says:

    Making a written declaration gives your brain a map to follow. I am enjoying my journey R+F…I know how this story ends:)Love the blog!

  4. Chrissy Armyn says:

    I love reading your stories, makes my long term dream all that more possible! Thank u

  5. […] Doing it yourself feels good! That’s why entrepreneurs want to start their own business. There is a lot of satisfaction in doing something successfully. […]

  6. Robyn Holder says:

    Thank you for your post. I need to print this out and read it every day to remind myself to keep picking myself up and looking at each “no” as less of a rejection and more of a learning opportunity. I also know that I need to hold myself more accountable for putting more effort into my business for it to be more successful.

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